1911 Forums : 1911Talk banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,072 Posts
aye-aye, its an aye-aye.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes it is an Aye Aye!!! So ugly it is cute!!!!:rofl:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,072 Posts
Exactly right.
 

·
Old Sheepdog
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
That's a REAL dog? :confused:

How big will it get? Tracy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tracy, no it is not a dog but an Aye Aye!!!! I have seen some ugly animals but that one takes the cake!!!!:rofl::rofl:
 

·
Old Sheepdog
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
So it's alive, right?

And it's not a dog?

What animal family does it belong to?


(Not a Gremlin right?:wink:)

I'm confused. Tracy
 

·
Old Sheepdog
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
OK, Just found it---

Aye-aye
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Aye-aye[1]
An Aye-aye eating banana flowers.
An Aye-aye eating banana flowers.
Conservation status

Near Threatened (IUCN 3.1)[2]
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Suborder: Strepsirrhini
Infraorder: Chiromyiformes
Anthony and Coupin, 1931
Family: Daubentoniidae
Gray, 1863
Genus: Daubentonia
É. Geoffroy, 1795
Species: D. madagascariensis
Binomial name
Daubentonia madagascariensis
(Gmelin, 1788)

The Aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) is a strepsirrhine native to Madagascar that combines rodent-like teeth with a long, thin middle finger to fill the same ecological niche as a woodpecker. It is the world's largest nocturnal primate, and is characterized by its unusual method of finding food; it taps on trees to find grubs, then gnaws holes in the wood and inserts its elongated middle finger to pull the grubs out. The only other animals known to find food in this way is the Striped Possum.[citation needed] From an ecological point of view the Aye-aye fills the niche of a woodpecker as it is capable of penetrating wood to extract the invertebrates within.[3]

Daubentonia is the only genus in the family Daubentoniidae and infraorder Chiromyiformes. The Aye-aye is the only extant member of the genus (although it is currently classified as Near Threatened by the IUCN); a second species, Daubentonia robusta, appears to have become extinct at some point within the last 1000 years.[4]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Physical characteristics
* 2 Habitat
* 3 Behavior
o 3.1 Social interaction
o 3.2 Foraging
+ 3.2.1 Diet
+ 3.2.2 Social foraging
* 4 History
* 5 Superstition and public controversy
* 6 Classification
* 7 References
* 8 External links

[edit] Physical characteristics
Aye-aye

The Aye-aye is the world's largest nocturnal prosimian, and dwells predominantly in forest canopies.[5] It weighs about 2.5 kilograms, with the female weighing in slightly less (by an average of 100 grams) than males. Other than weight and sex organs, aye-ayes exhibit no sexual dimorphism of any kind. They all grow from 30-37 cm from head to body, with a 44-53 cm tail.

The adult Aye-aye has black or dark brown fur covered by white guard hairs at the neck. The tail is bushy and shaped like that of a squirrel. The Aye-aye's face is also rodent-like, the shape of a raccoon's, and mouses bright, beady, luminous eyes. Its incisors are very large, and grow continuously throughout its lifespan. These features contrast its monkey-like body, and are the likely cause of why scientists originally deemed it to be a rodent.

The Aye-aye's hands are arguably its most unusual feature. Much like other primates, it possesses opposable thumbs, but both the hallux and the fingers are long and slender, and appear to be in a curved position somewhat similar to that of a fairy-tale witch when the muscles are relaxed.[clarification needed] The middle finger can be up to three times longer than the others.

Gestation for the Aye-aye lasts from 5 to 5 1/3 months. Births can occur at any time during the year, and females often wait 2-3 years between births. The infant takes about 7 months to be weaned, and stays with its mother for two years. The Aye-aye matures quickly; males rarely take more than 1 1/2 years to mature, and females take about an extra year. Lifespan is not known, but the world record is 23 years in captivity.

Tracy
 

·
Old Sheepdog
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
OK, to go back and answer the initial question---"what do you think"



Words escape me. Tracy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,367 Posts
Well If I said the first thing that came out of my mouth, it would have been caught by the naughty word filter.....

I'm with you Tracy, I haven't got a clue what the heck that thing is.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top