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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there anything you guys do to become better shooters? I have a concept VII and PII 1 1/2" and I love these guns, but wish I could do tighter groups...

7 to 10 yards are "ok"....

15-20 yards... I hit the paper... but shoot I know with these guns I should be shooting decent groups! I know everyone says you should just shoot and shoot.. but is there anything I can work on when I go? Drills?

I just want to be more consistent and shoot tight groups all the time. You know.... like how mel gibson did in lethal weapon! haha

Any input will be appreciated...
 

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The first principle of accurate shooting is trigger control: a smooth, press straight back on the trigger with only the trigger finger moving to a surprise break. Maintain your focus on the front sight as you press the trigger, increasing pressure on the trigger until the shot breaks. Don't try to predict exactly when the gun will go off nor try to cause the shot to break at a particular moment. This is what Jeff Cooper called the "surprise break."

BY keeping focus on the front sight and increasing pressure on the trigger until the gun essentially shoots itself, you don’t anticipate the shot breaking. But if you try to make the shot break at that one instant in time when everything seem steady and aligned, you usually wind up jerking the trigger. Of course the gun will wobble some on the target. Try not to worry about the wobble and don’t worry about trying to keep the sight aligned on a single point. Just let the front sight be somewhere in a small, imaginary box in the center of the target.

Also, work on follow through. Be aware of where on the target the front sight is as the shot breaks and watch the front sight lift off that point as the gun recoils – all the time maintaining focus on the front sight.

Also, while practice in very important, remember that practice doesn’t make perfect. It’s “PERFECT practice makes perfect.†More frequent practice shooting fewer rounds, but concentrating hard on what you’re doing, will be more productive than less frequent, higher round count practice.

Practice deliberately, making every shot count, to program good habits and muscle memory. Dry practice is very helpful. You just want to triple check that the gun is not loaded, and there should be no ammunition anywhere around. When engaging in dry practice, religiously follow Rule 2 - Never Let Your Muzzle Cover Anything You Are Not Willing To Destroy." As you dry fire, you want to reach the point where you can't see any movement of the sight as the sear releases and the hammer falls.

Finally, some instruction is always a good idea. I try to take classes from time to time; and I always learn something new.

Think: front sight, press, surprise.
 

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Well said Frank.

I limit caffeine for 6 - 8 hours before I shoot, that limits any uncontrolled hand movements.

Speaking of Mel Gibson - let's remember what he told his sons out there in the woods facing all those red coats "Aim small, miss small".
 

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+1 Frank.

One of the best drills I know for doing just what Frank is talking about is, "The Wall Drill."

Stand in front of a plain wall with an UNLOADED pistol. Press the muzzle against the wall at full extension with a full firing grip. Break contact with the wall, only about 1/2".

Get a good sight picture, perfectly alligned, focusing on the front sight. Press the trigger slowly until it breaks. Repeat 5x. The first time you do this you will see your front sight flopping around like a fish on the beach!

The wall drill keeps you from looking down range. It promotes perfect followthrough and front sight maintenence. Not to mention TRIGGER CONTROL!
 

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These guys have got it covered .. just proper practice
 

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Can't add much to the above posts. All good information, especially about 'dry fire drills'. In my opinion, DF is the single best drill to improve trigger control and front sight focus.

One other thing to consider is the frequency of your practice work - good shooting is a perishable skill.

If you don't shoot very often it's difficult to get better. When you do get better, you need to shoot more often to retain the skill.
Practice, practice, practice.
 

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Do you have access to any really good training?
In the first class I attended, we had spent maybe 15 minutes on the range and fired 10 rounds, and I had learned a bunch. From changing my grip a little to refining my trigger control to fixing my follow through, a really good instructor saw and corrected things I would have spent years and thousands of rounds to find and fix, if ever.
And no, I wasn't new when I went to that class.
But I made my biggest leaps during and after that class.

Besides the time saved, it was a lot cheaper to pay for that class than to buy the ammo I would have used doing the same (wrong) things over and over, hoping to stumble over fixes myself.
 

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As the others have stated, Frank really nailed it. I was fortunate to have some very outstanding training early on so I got rid of my bad habits fairly quickly.

Very important-remember to breathe. It's amazing how many shooters forget this simple rule. It's true of shooting, fighting, virtually any "hobby" or "sport" you pursue.

The trick, as Barry points out, is to get some really good training. You will be taught things you never thought of on your own.

Having good cardiovascular health is a major asset as well. Taking care of your body will allow you to function at a higher, more efficient level (ok, a little obvious but important none the less).

Finally I really concentrate on my Mel Gibson targets :biglaugh:, he's such a tool.
 

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Everyone has covered all the bases.. I will only add which helped me was to shoot at 50 to 100 yards for a month.. do some practice at home like the others told you.... after a month at long range go to 25 yards for another month and practice at home .. than go to 25 feet and you will laugh how easy shooting at 25 or even 50 feet will seem. It works for me
get a Spotting Scope for the long range shooting and make each shot count..
:nuts:
 

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..I will only add which helped me was to shoot at 50 to 100 yards for a month..
I shot handgun silhouette for a few years (rimfire).
I don't think anything could have done a better job of teaching me the importance of concentrating on the front sight.

When shooting at a little steel animals at up to 100 yards, the slightest blurring of focus or lost concentration will get you a miss every time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks! How do you even hit the paper at 50 or 100 yards? At 20, its hard enough!

anyone know anybody good (instructiors) in LA or OC?
 

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thanks! How do you even hit the paper at 50 or 100 yards? At 20, its hard enough!

anyone know anybody good (instructiors) in LA or OC?
Contact the NRA and ask about Bullseye shooting in your area. Attend a match or two and take the time to talk to the best shooters. Ask them humbly how to get better and to recommend someone.

You will be surprised at how friendly shooters are and how willingly they will share information.
 

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Ping Ping's wall drill was most helpful to me....I shot competitively for many years and
was AA in all guns at skeet so I slapped the trigger when the lead was right...doing this with my Les Baer creates a circle of about 3-4 inches around the 10x ring...which is allright at 20 yards...but doing the drill...improved that pattern immencely...for me it was tough to break old habits...habits that worked fine...I have the silver trophy buckles to prove it...BUT not with pistols...so the wall drill was invaluable...
 

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Fiddletown hit the nail on the head...to put all that in a word..."fundamentals".

Everybody has to crawl before they walk...

I practice a lot at 50 yards...about 400 rounds a week most of the time (time available varies). Shooting at longer distance forces you to pay more attention to trigger control.
 

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i could not agree more with all the info that's been posted above. for me personally one of things that helped my shooting in leaps and bounds was going back to A 22 , to practice my fundamentals without the recoil and muzzle blast. even during my ipsc years i would occassionally go back and shoot the 22 when i found myself not focusing or getting sloppey. just a little something that worked for me and also taking a good nra basic training course. good luck
 

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Bump Drill

Here's another one for you.

At the range, with live ammo, practice bumping the sear. Get a good sight picture and slowly press the trigger until you feel the sear. Stop. Release the trigger until there's a little daylight between your finger and the trigger. Press again, this time slightly harder, but not hard enough to break the shot. Release again...

It should take you three or four "bumps" to increase pressure enough to break the shot. It should (will, if done properly) surprise you. The other thing that will surprise you is how tight your groups just became.:wink:

Again, same as the Wall Drill, do the drill five times and rest. Do 5 sets of 5 shots, each range sesson for the rest of your life. The days of flinching and jerking will be a fading, distant memory.
 

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i can't add much to the great info already mentioned
but would echo Traderjack

"One other thing to consider is the frequency of your practice work - good shooting is a perishable skill."

Shooting is kind of like my golf game

when i only play once a week, it's tough to get consistanlty low scores .

when I'm playing a couple/three times a week, my scores are much better

I notice the same with shooting.
It's ESPECIALLY noticable with my snubbie revolver.


..L.T.A.
 
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