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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Today was the day I finished the conversion on the Sig Platinum from a Series 80 to the Series 70. The Series 80 parts from Sig are thinner than same parts from Colt. TJ shims from are the correct size for a Colt but required reduction for a correct fit in the Platinum. I had to take the part from 50 thousandths to 49 thousandths. That took a while with 600 grit sandpaper, but boy is it smooth. I also polished (LIGHTLY) both sides of the sear. I don't have the necessary equipment to measure the trigger pull, but it seems to be less than the original (or it may be the Proud Papa syndrome). With what I learned from this (3 1/2 hour) job, I did the same thing to my Gold Cup in 18 minutes. Correct sized drop in part helped with that time.
:shades:
 

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Make sure you check the Shim every 1000-2k rounds they like to ding up around the sear and hammer pin holes... Some have reported they cut into the sear and hammer pin but i've never see that
 

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The sig's have a much tighter tolerance than any production 1911 I have ever owned. I put the shims in 2 sigs and they had to be fitted also. I like to stone everything.

I've never had any problems with the shims, and I would guess there would be less likely on the sigs since there is no play at all, but I check all the parts in my guns regularly anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the input, I knew the Sigs had tighter tolerances but this proved it. I was planning on detail strips every 2k rounds show I will add this to the parts check.

Sam
 

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I thought the Dan wessons were tight, and they are, but the sigs have to be the tightest production guns out there.
 
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