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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. FNG here. I like the CC and SD sections of these forums, so as a form of introduction, I thought I might repost an article I was asked to write for another forum last month. Don't worry, the info below is STILL valid. :biglaugh:
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All too often we find ourselves listening to or reading about an incident involving someone's reaction to a deadly situation and wondering how WE would have reacted. We often spot the mistakes the other person made tactically, and sometimes these mistakes are glaring. Some fail to have a weapon, some have the weapon in an inaccessible place, some fail to recognize a threat, and some are just “wrong place, wrong time” sort of guys.

I think that we all realize the importance of training with our duty or carry weapon, and am sure the most of us practice regularly. The question we should ALL ask ourselves is, “How realistic is my training?”

I often see people bring a few pistols to the local range, and they do fire accurately and hit what they shoot at (sometimes!), but rarely do I see someone actually practice the draw. I do wonder how often we practice drawing from our holsters, whether a duty holster, or your typical CCW holster. For those of us guys who wear a “shoot me first” vest or otherwise cover our holster, how often do we practice drawing and firing a concealed weapon from UNDER concealment? I am sure that we often practice “weak hand” shooting, but have you ever tried to draw your weapon with the weak hand? You might find that with your chosen method of carrying, if your strong hand is injured, YOU ARE UNARMED for all intents and purposes.

Many times, I find that people carry a pistol without a round chambered. This is NOT typical among trained shooters, but many choose to use the “Israeli Draw”, and rack the slide while drawing a semi-automatic pistol. If the situation allows, I usually ask them why, and after the inevitable demonstration of how quick they can do this, I request that they do it “strong hand only”. It gives them something to think about.

Think about the basic steps you perform to fire your pistol. Do you use a particular grip that works great on the range? Now, try that grip with one hand. Do you have to significantly change your strong hand grip with the weak hand is removed? If you do, you are practicing to have an unfamiliar grip on the pistol when you need it the most!

Do you always fire from the same stance? Your accuracy will suffer if you cannot fire from that stance in a real life situation. How much? Who knows, but why not practice from a variety of stances, to include sitting, lying down, and most importantly moving.

Do you keep a gun on your nightstand beside your eyeglasses? What if you need the pistol FAST, and knock your glasses to the floor, or simply don't have time to put them on? Ever practice without your glasses to see how well you can still shoot if you can’t see any sight? It might be a good thing to know!

The examples of “real” training are limited only by your personal experience. Some may have unique situations that they never realize they need to incorporate into their regular training!

The point to all this rambling is to impress on the mind of the discerning shooter, that things can go very different in real life than they do on the range. Don’t take the short-cuts in your practice and training. Don’t train for the “best case” scenario, as this is usually NOT the one that your will find yourself in. Look at every single piece of the Personal Defense puzzle and make sure that you think about and practice everything!

Remember, surviving a lethal situation can begin MONTHS before the few seconds of the actual event.
 

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Very nice, thanks for sharing it and welcome.
 

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Great post,and welcome.

People too often think that owning a handgun means they can automatically be ready in the blink of an eye,and fix (however that may be) any bad scenario. Wrong!You must prctice,practice,practice and the only limit on your training is yourself!

I'm on some forums that aren't gun-related,and when firearms are brought up I am astounded at the pure ignorance of some of the comments. You wouldn't believe how many people have simply draw conclusions from television. It's frightening. Especially knowing that these people will vote in the next election!
 

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Welcome
 

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Agreed. Nice post and welcome..

-Frank
 

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Welcome and thanks for a good post.

I do practice drawing and shooting from different stances. I also shoot IDPA to help train my defensive ability. Now I know a lot of people will say IDPA is just a game but I feel that it depends on how you approach it. I shoot what I carry, the way I carry and I am not worried about beating other peoples times. I constantly have people come up to me and say you could shoot a better TIME with this or this. I politely nod and explain why I shoot exactly as I carry on the street. It is not perfect but I use what I can to train the best I can. I also took several lessons from a local instructor who also works doing executive level security. It was the most eye opening experience of my time shooting.

I will tell you what scares me. I meet people all the time that buy a gun, shoot it 2-3 times and think they are good to go. When they are asked the last time they handled or shot thier guns they say "Oh, 7-8 months ago."
 

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Welcome to the forum R.Butler!!!:smile::smile:
 

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Welcome to the forum...EXCELLENT post...

And a little something to add to it if I may...

Training should not be limited to shooting or tactics...we should all get some training on when its justifiable to use deadly force in your state...for me (and maybe some others) that could cover a lot of ground...but it beats the heck out of going to prison for shooting somebody in the wrong place at the wrong time, and most of all, for the wrong reason. I think there is a trend thats leaning a little to far towards "shoot first, ask questions later"...don't fall victim to this. There are classes available that teach the finer points of when its justifiable to use deadly force...find them and take them...I promise you it is $$$ well spent.

FWIW, I am on a mission to encourage everybody to take these classes...we have come a loooong way with our 2nd Amendment rights in the past few years...too far to let a few "uneducated mishaps" screw it all up again...and it could happen VERY fast, with the right screwup.
 

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Great post.

I shoot USPSA 3 times a month, while I don't shoot with my carry pistol or holster I still stay with in a 1911 platform. I can say its an eye opener. Even being able to walk through the stages first, I still find myself not running the stage as planned and thats why I shoot as much as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Welcome to the forum...EXCELLENT post...

And a little something to add to it if I may...

Training should not be limited to shooting or tactics...we should all get some training on when its justifiable to use deadly force in your state...for me (and maybe some others) that could cover a lot of ground...but it beats the heck out of going to prison for shooting somebody in the wrong place at the wrong time. I think there is a trend thats leaning a little to far towards "shoot first, ask questions later"...don't fall victim to this. There are classes available that teach the finer points of when its justifiable to use deadly force...find them and take them...I promise you it is $$$ well spent.

FWIW, I am on a mission to encourage everybody to take these classes...we have come a loooong way with our 2nd Amendment rights in the past few years...too far to let a few "uneducated mishaps" screw it all up again...and it could happen VERY fast, with the right screwup.

Excellent point Ridgerunner! This is all too often the 'forgotten" part of carrying a weapon!
 

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Welcome R. Butler and an excellent post. I agree.

And Ridge, I agree with you as well.

What both of you have written bears to be repeated.
 

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Welcome aboard.
 
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