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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up a LNIB used SA MC Operator.

I was wandering what parts (if any) are MIM. I would like to get rid of all MIM parts eventually.

I will be replacing the ILS with a Wilson Combat upgrade in a few days. Any other recommendations on replacement parts?

I've tried Google already and haven't had any definitive hits on a MIM parts list that are currently on the MC Operator.


Thanks,
Kevin
 

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I think that the thumb safety and grip safety are MIM. I think there are other parts as well, but I can't remember what they are. I have never heard of any problems with the MIM parts in the Operators, but I don't blame you for wanting to switch them out. I was trying to buy an MC Operator (sweet guns) as a base for a custom, but saved a bunch of money and went with a custom Fusion build. Maybe one day I'll get an MC Operator, and just keep it stock. Please post some pics!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I ordered a set of Simonich gunners Grips, that is coming in a few days. i'll try to get some pics once they arrive. Ordering a Snakeskin MSH from Ed Brown too.

After that my next big purchase is a Jarvis Threaded with either a Gemtech or YHM suppressor :)
 

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SA uses MIM in all there guns to include the SA Pro. In most cases MIM is much ado about nothing IMO. There is MIM in the engine of your car, MIM in Glock, Ruger and probably 95% of all gun manufacturing.


Just to name a few parts that are MIM:

extractor
ejector
firing pin stop
hammer, sear etc.
slide stop
safety

Just about all the small parts.

The only thing I would change would be the extractor if I were really concerned. SA has very good parts even the MIM ones. Tool steel breaks too. One day I want to put a C&S ignition system in my TRP.

This is from the STI web site FAQ's:

Q. Does STI use any MIM parts?
A1 Yes. We, like most manufacturers, do but not in any of the "critical" stress or wear components. Our good friend Bob Serva of Fusion Firearms has graciously allowed us to quote his response to this question.

"Gentlemen, the hysteria over MIM has been going on for many years. The facts are that MIM and PM (powder metal) are modern manufacturing processes that do have their place. Many parts lend themselves to MIM processes due to there shape and function. I have been working as a manufacturing engineer and closely with the firearms industry for over 20 years. I can give you some of my experience and facts of MIM and PM.

Q. Are MIM parts of lesser quality than cast, forged or barstock?
A. NO. MIM and PM parts if designed and processed properly are as good as the other process for most small part applications. Design, material selection and heat-treatment processes play a big part in quality and serviceable life of the part. For example, most people don’t understand how many products they use everyday that are MIM and PM processed. Items such as the transmission gears in your car, valves, the jaws on the cordless drill you use and many types of carbide tooling for machining to name a few.

Q. Why do manufactures use them in there product?
A. Quality and cost. MIM and PM allow for consistent process that produces repeatability and good quality parts of complicated geometry. Tooling for MIM parts is very expensive and you need to produce a product with some volume in sales or it is very hard to justify the costs.

Q. Can you make substandard quality MIM parts?
A. Yes. Again, design and process control are critical to good quality MIM parts. But this is also true with cast, forged, or barstock parts. If good manufacturing processes are not followed you will get parts of sub-standard quality.

Q. Why do we seem to see more MIM parts fail?
A. This is pure Numbers. Most production firearms include MIM or PM parts- Yes, you might not want to believe it but most all pistols, revolvers, and rifles contain MIM or PM parts. Most people, without knowing the difference, have been using these for many years. Why we hear about it more is because the majority of pistols and revolvers have some MIM content in them. So, if we want to look at this logically you have to think in PPM. (PPM is Parts Per Million- it is a basis to how to figure a parts failure rate and its effect on the product.) For example if in 2005 there were 500,000 pistol produced with MIM slide stops and the failure rate worked out to be 1 failure per 1000, we would see 500 MIM slide stops fail. If in the same year we produced 50,000 with bar stock slide stops with the same failure rate we would hear of 50 failures. So Yes, we do hear of more MIM failures and we probably should due to the fact that they are, at a minimum, of 10 to 1 in annual sales.

So Yes, MIM does has its place and it can and does produce high quality and durable parts. Yes, some will fail, just as cast, forged, and barstock parts also fail. I have used 1000’s of STI parts in production 1911’s over the years and the failure rate was basically the same with MIM as with the other manufacturing processes. I have worked closely with the people at STI for many years and their designs and process controls are first class. They do not skimp or try to cheapen their product to save a nickel. They use the best processes and materials available and they always have the goal to offer their customers products of exceptional quality and attention to detail."
 

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Forged parts are just like MIM parts, they both require good quality control.

I have several pistols with MIM parts and have never seen a breakage. One of them is my 10 year old Kimber Target that has seen thousands of rounds and is still running. On the other hand I have seen failures of machined steel parts. The one was an ejector and the other was a barrel bushing.

One area where I don't think I would use MIM is in parts that flex such as the extractor. I feel that spring steel is the best in that environment.

Springfield stands by their MIM parts and claims that they rarely see broken parts. Faulty MIM or machined steel parts seem to break in the first 500 rounds. Get out and shoot the gun, it should determine whether or not you have a good one. :biggrin:
 

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Anyone know of a good concealed holster for a Operator?
Milt Sparks VMII, one of the best, takes 20-26 weeks to get it though. I would suggest you try a Kydex holster. I think you will find that the rail will slow the draw in a tight fitting leather holster. For that reason I prefer a standard 1911 with no front slide serrations in a leather carry holster.

Try a Black Hawk Serpa, their Serpa works with railed and non-rail 1911 and it comes with a paddel and belt slide attachments.

Good Luck!
 

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MIM parts

I have a S/A SS Champion, that had MIM parts, I replaced the sear, hammer, mainspring housing(to get rid of the ILS) replaced with an Smith Alexander mainspring housing straight. I have not replaced the grip safety, slide stop, or firing pin stop. The only part that I am concerned about is the slide stop, at lot of stress there. I will not bet my life on mim parts. I have seen too many broken guns with MIM parts. A raptor first time out broke the ejector and locked the gun up, could not get it open to clear the round in the chamber. MIM is ok for stuff like firing pin stops,slide stops and pins, maybe. But I will not waste my time on trying to do a trigger job on MIM parts, once you break through the surface hardness they are soft soft, and a waste of time. that is why I replace hammer, sear, and springs when I do a trigger job.
On a nother note did your S/A have the last 3 digits of the serial number etched into the bottom of the slide were the disconnector rides over it. BAD Springfield, makes for a really gritty slide cycle, and bead blasted the internal surfaces of the frame including the trigger slot, makes for a really gritty trigger pull until you get all the bead blast w2orn awawy.
 
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