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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at purchasing some Grizzly equipment to do some pistolsmithing. I would like your comments and suggestions. The lathe is the G4000, 9x19 benchtop. Next is the 0463 mill. I realize they are on the small side, but considering pistols are all I'll be doing, I figured it would be better to invest in tooling instead of bigger machinery. Again, any and all suggestions are appreciated.
 

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Unfortunately, this is a case of where bigger IS better.... :whistle:

Now - having said that, I'll also say that having ANY lathe / mill is better than not having one at all, IMHO.

I started out with a 7x10 bench lathe and was able to produce some mighty fine results with it after upgrading / fine-tuning the machine. I still have it, but have since moved up to a 12x36 machine that I can use for rifle work as well. The weight/rigidity of the machine makes a big difference.

One thing I think you will find, is that you will be somewhat limited in your availability to find tooling to fit the smaller machines. At least that has been my experience....


If you haven't already been there, this is a good source for info. Scroll down for the Lathes and Machinery Links:
http://www.varmintal.com/alink.htm#Mini-Lathe

And above all -- have fun with your new toys! :dancingbananna:
 

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Nkotb

:thinking:
Mill
Lathe
Blast Cabinet
Paint Booth
Shop
Lot and lots of very exspensive tools from Brownells and Midway USA.,,,,,

I started almost 2 years ago and I am still waiting to make my firt nickel:eek:

Jess Gypin
OnTarget Custom Gunworks
http://www.ontargetcgw.com

Seriously, if there are any questions I can answer or anything I can do to make your start easier, just give me a buzz
 

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I have access to both a Mill ,lathe, Buffers, sandblasters anytime I need to.
Yes it cost alot but actually for the amount that was saved in making parts for almost anything if one can afford it, it is well worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the info. I have to agree with all of you, thats my problem. I had to set limitations on the equipment or I would have gone hog wild. I would really like to have a bridgeport, and a 40" lathe BUT my self impossed constraints are :

110 power, fit in the basement, which means carry down the steps, limit myself to pistol work only.

The mill I'm looking at uses an R-8 collar so tooling should be ok there. The lathe on the other hand uses an MT#3 or 4 depending on which one I go with. I might move up to the 10x22 which uses the mt#4.

I'm not looking to do anything as involved as Jess does (great website by the way). I do have some ideas for example on how to fix the m&p mag drop problem. Also some upgrade parts for the XD 45 line. Niche market type stuff.

I guess my bottom line is good quality basic machinery that I can tweak to improve precision.
 

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With a good set of stones and the correct jig's you can do alot in itself add a buffing wheel too. Browells sells the jig's and stones to make sears break like glass, sweeten you trigger pull. lots of gun work is really done better by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Good point. I've been spending so much time looking at machinery and tooling that I put the hand work equipment on the back burner. Thanks for reminding me. Now all I need is a new pair of eyes for the close work.
 

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slbotos, I have to agree with Highpwr, bigger is definitely better.

But, since your limitations decree a benchtop lathe make sure it is totally and completely secured to the bench. The heavier the base the better your end results will be. Vibration and any unwanted movement will be your enemies.
Good luck with your project!
 
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